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Creating educated readers of Scripture

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St. Paul arrived in Corinth sometime in late A.D. 50, the last stop on his 2nd missionary journey (A.D. 50-52). When Paul walked the 52-mile trek from Athens to Corinth, he entered one of the greatest and most modern cities of the Roman Empire.   Archaeology suggests that Corinth was occupied as early as 6500 B.C., and by 740 B.C. (about the time of the biblical king Ahaz and the Jewish prophet Isaiah) it was a major Greek city with a population of at least 5,000 people. By 400 B.C. Corinth was one of the largest and most powerful cities in Greece, with a population of over 90,000, and by the end of the 2nd-century B.C. it was capital of the Achaean League, a confederation of over 50 Peloponnese city-states.   Corinth’s power and influence came to an abrupt end, however. In 146 B.C. Rome declared war on the Achaean League, and the Roman General Lucius Mummius attacked Corinth; put all the men of the city to the sword; sold the women and children into slavery; shipped statues, paintings, works of art and anything else of value to Rome; and he razed Corinth, reducing it to ashes. For his swift and decisive victory over Corinth and the Achaean League, Rome awarded Mummius a triumphal procession: he entered Rome in a chariot drawn by four white horses, the general himself was crowned with laurel leaves, and he wore a purple and gold-embroidered triumphal toga. The crowds cheered him wildly. Read More

Revelation is the final book in the Christian canon and the concluding narrative in the story of redemption. No other book in the Bible seems so cryptic as Revelation, no other book so extravagant in its symbolism and wild visions, and no other book so given to misreading and misinterpretation.  Although written nearly 2,000 years ago, Revelation still grips our imagination with its drama, nightmare visions, exotic imagery, stunning colors, full-tilt sound, and over-the-top, blood-soaked violence. Yet, most who read Revelation come away baffled and bewildered, scratching their heads.  What are we to make of this puzzling work?   Hieronymous Bosch. St. John the Evangelist on Patmos (oil on oak), c. 1489. Gemäldegalerie: Berlin.    This course includes 18 video lectures, with a comprehensive 40-page text introduction and syllabus, artworks, maps, PowerPoint slides, Knowledge Check quizzes, and more.  On top of the interactive online material, you will also be able to contact Dr. Creasy and the Logos Team directly with any questions that arise during your studies.  As you make your way through the lectures, Dr. Creasy will contact you with special opportunities to join him for "Virtual Office Hours" using our Webinar platform.  Read More

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